Schedule at a Glance

8:30-9:30 Check into Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at 223 – 65 Dafoe Road, refreshments*, and networking
* Sponsored by Student Advocacy, The University of Manitoba
9:30-9:45 Welcome Address
9:45-11:15 Institution-wide approaches to academic integrity
11:15-12:15 Lunch break* and networking
* Sponsored by the Manitoba Flexible Learning HUB
12:15-1:45 Faculty support for academic integrity
1:45-2:00 Refreshment break*
* Sponsored by Campus Manitoba
2:00-3:30 Student support for academic integrity
3:30-3:45 Closing remarks

Detailed Schedule

8:30-9:30 Check into Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at 223 – 65 Dafoe Road, refreshments*, and networking
* Sponsored by Student Advocacy, The University of Manitoba
9:30-9:45 Welcome Address
9:45-10:15 Institution-wide approaches to academic integrity

S.01 Creating an institutional strategy for academic integrity at the University of Manitoba
Brandy Usick, Director, Student Advocacy, University of Manitoba

10:15-11:15 Cracker Barrel Sessions**
CB.01 One College’s Academic Integrity Odyssey
Josh Seeland, Assiniboine Community College
CB.02 Organizing academic integrity-themed campus events
Loie Gervais & Susie Ally, University of Manitoba
CB.03 Copyright: 11 questions in 10 minutes
Tobe Duggan, University of Manitoba
11:15-12:15 Lunch break*
* Sponsored by the Manitoba Flexible Learning HUB
12:15-12:45 Faculty support for academic integrity

S.02 Do academic integrity tutorials really work?
Brenda Stoesz, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

12:45-1:45 Cracker Barrel Sessions**
CB.04 Untitled Session
Tina Chen, University of Manitoba
CB.05 Promoting Academic Integrity and Responding to Misconduct in Online Teaching
Ryan Los, Manitoba’s Flexible Learning HUB
CB.06 Responding to academic misconduct: Benefits and challenges
Brandy Usick & Brenda Stoesz, University of Manitoba
1:45-2:00 Refreshment break*
* Sponsored by Campus Manitoba
2:00-2:30 Student support for academic integrity

S.03 Why is it difficult to avoid plagiarism? Chinese students’ dilemma in English academic writing
Yunyi Chen, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

2:30-3:30 Cracker Barrel Sessions**
CB.07 International students: Academic dishonesty or misunderstanding?
Kelly Carpick & Ken Molloy, PACE, University of Winnipeg
CB.08 Providing academic integrity educational student supports
Loie Gervais, University of Manitoba
CB.09 Difficult sources: Teaching students the art of integrating and acknowledging sources
Miriam Unruh & Kathy Block, University of Manitoba
3:30-3:45 Closing remarks

** A Cracker Barrel Session consists of a mini-session that is presented 3 times in a 60-minute session. The presenter introduces a topic (5-10 minutes), and then facilitates a discussion about the topic (5-10 minutes). Participants will be invited to comment and ask questions. After 20 minutes, participants will move to another table to listen to another presenter and participate in a new discussion.

Session Abstracts

S.01 Creating an institutional strategy for academic integrity at the University of Manitoba
Brandy Usick, Director, Student Advocacy and Accessibility, University of Manitoba

Students, faculty, staff and administrators at the University of Manitoba are working together to build and maintain a culture of academic integrity grounded in individual and institutional responsibility. A change management model has been adapted to identify key issues, set priorities for addressing these issues, and assess the impact of individual activities. In this session, elements of the institutional strategy, including projects, programs and resources, will be shared with participants.

Presenter Bio. Brandy Usick B.A. (Hons), M. Ed. is Director of Student Advocacy and Accessibility at the University of Manitoba. She is the co-chair of the Academic Integrity Advisory Committee, which includes overseeing the initiative for the university. Brandy frequently presents sessions on student issues, most notably on academic integrity and conducting fair hearings. Brandy is a member of several university committees and working groups that provide direction on student support services, programs, and policies.


CB.01 One College’s Academic Integrity Odyssey
Josh Seeland, Library Technician, Assiniboine Community College

At Assiniboine Community College (ACC) in Brandon, members of the Learning Commons (the Library and Learning Curve) have collaborated on a dynamic, bottom-up academic integrity initiative. Initially focused on proactive ways to limit plagiarism among incoming international students, it has evolved in breadth and depth to also address the larger issue of academic integrity at an institutional level. In examining ACC’s continuing odyssey, participants will compare and contrast their own similar efforts, as well as discuss related existing research. How are we able to cultivate or even create a culture of academic integrity? In what ways can we successfully promote academic integrity in our individual roles? How can we reduce plagiarism among international students?

Presenter Bio. Josh Seeland graduated with honours from Red River College's Library Technician program in 2003 and has since been working towards a B.A. in History and Philosophy through the University of Manitoba. After beginning with the libraries of River East Transcona School Division, he moved on to the Assiniboine Community College library in 2007, where his primary duties have been cataloguing, interlibrary loan, and presentations for ACC students across the province. More recent duties and research have come to include academic integrity and information literacy.


CB.02 Organizing academic integrity-themed campus events
Loie Gervais, Academic Integrity Coordinator, University of Manitoba
Susie Ally, Student Advocate, Student Advocacy, University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba hosted a month-long academic integrity event in October 2016. The event was a collaborative effort between campus units and utilized marketing materials designed for the Academic Integrity initiative. The month included the promotion of existing faculty, student and staff workshops, in addition to a number of targeted outreach events. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss strategies for organizing academic integrity-themed events at their institutions.

Presenter Bios. Loie Gervais is the Academic Integrity Coordinator at the University of Manitoba. In her role, she manages projects for the Academic Integrity Advisory Committee, implements institutional communications plans, and provides pre- and post-discipline process educational support to students. She holds an MSc in Management with a focus on organizational behavior research.

Susie Ally started working for Student Advocacy in the 2014 as a Junior Student Advocate before becoming a full time Student Advocate. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons.) from the University of Manitoba and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree. She previously held the position of Vice-President, Advocacy for the University of Manitoba Students Union. Susie has received Mental Health First Aid training and has completed an online course on Student Affairs in Higher Education through Colorado State University.


CB.03 Copyright: 11 questions in 10 minutes
Tobe Duggan, Copyright Coordinator, Copyright Office, University of Manitoba

“I can copy this, right?” The U of M Copyright Office receives this question or variations of it on a steady basis from faculty, instructors, staff, and graduate students. Asking for clarification about copyright is completely understandable because it can be complex, confusing, and fraught with worry about possible infringement. The objective of this session is to provide clarity on the use of copyright protected works for educational purposes, by presenting some of the most common inquiries fielded by the Copyright Office. Among the topics covered will be Fair Dealing, copying photos, figures, and artwork into lecture slides, as well as the use e-resources accessed through institutional libraries.

Presenter Bio. Hired by the Office of Fair Practices and Legal Affairs in 2015, Tobe’s primary responsibility is working with the U of M educational community to ensure that copyright protected works distributed in course content are compliant with both Canada’s Copyright Act and the UM Copyright Guidelines. Prior to U of M, Tobe was the Image and Copyright Coordinator at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Negotiating complex copyright issues, license agreements, and sensitive permission requests with Canadian and international sources, Tobe secured the use of archival and contemporary photos, artwork, and media for both exhibit displays and online presentation.


S.02 Do academic integrity tutorials really work?
Brenda Stoesz, Faculty Specialist – Academic Integrity & Copyright, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

The statistics on cheating in academic work are staggering.  Depending on the study, upwards of 80% of high school and undergraduate students admit to plagiarism, cheating on assignments, tests, or exams, or engaging in other categories of dishonest behaviours. Academic dishonesty clearly exists, so what can we do about it? One way of reducing the number of infractions is to align faculty and students’ knowledge of definitions and seriousness of the various types of academic misconduct. In an effort to educate students about expectations and consequences of academic dishonesty, instructors at various institutions have developed online tutorials and face-to-face workshops for this purpose. The objective of this session is to describe the effectiveness of these tutorials and workshops in reducing dishonesty and improving student outcomes. Results from recent research on this topic will be also shared.

Presenter Bio. Brenda Stoesz, BEd, BSc, PhD, is a Faculty Specialist – Academic Integrity and Copyright at The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba. She conducts research on academic integrity, facilitates workshops, and develops teaching resources for university instructors to help them promote academic integrity in their teaching and learning environments. Brenda is also an adjunct professor of psychology and co-advises graduate student research projects, and is involved in research related to face processing in typical and atypical development, and health and health care use of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.


CB.04 Untitled session
Tina Chen, Head, Department of History, University of Manitoba

This presentation comments on trends in forms of academic dishonesty that appear in writing-based courses in History at the University of Manitoba. In particular, plagiarism is currently much less common than false citation and inappropriate collaboration. Increasingly, we see a significant number of cases of commissioning/purchasing of papers (which are categorized as personation). In many cases, these papers are custom written for the assignment. So how do we identify these acts of academic dishonesty? What practices can be used in the classroom that promote student learning, avoid treating all students as likely violators of academic integrity, yet set the groundwork to identify students who are submitting work completed by others? I will share experiences with cases of purchased/commissioned papers and best practices developed within the Department. I will also reflect on the ways in which awareness of these forms of academic dishonesty have shaped my own classroom teaching and led to restructuring of my syllabus in exciting ways.

Presenter Bio. Tina Chen is Head and Professor of History, with research and teaching specializations in History of Modern China, migration and citizenship, cultural history and World History.  She has been involved in various groups interested in diversity, internationalization, and pedagogy.


CB.05 Promoting academic integrity and responding to misconduct in online teaching
Ryan Los, Instructional Designer, Manitoba’s Flexible Learning HUB & The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

Dr. Ryan Los will compare the unique differences in the ways in which online academic integrity is upheld. Specifically, he will describe the procedural complexities that can be present at the faculty level when a response to academic dishonesty is warranted. He will also highlight the differences between policing vs. coaching strategies that are utilized when responding to dishonest academic behaviour. Participants will be introduced to an online community involved in promoting dialogue between institutions on this subject matter. Participants will also discuss the challenges and opportunities that online instructors face regarding the promotion of academic integrity and discouraging cheating. 

Presenter Bio. Ryan Los is a course developer for Manitoba’s Flexible Learning HUB focusing on the development of online courses and professional development opportunities, and creating an online community for educators. He completed his PhD at the University of South Dakota in Counselling and Psychology in Education and focused on Human Development and Educational Psychology. While completing his dissertation, Ryan worked as an Educational Technology Integrationist with the Center for Teaching and Learning, University of South Dakota. Ryan has taught many online courses including Cognitive Approaches to Educational Psychology and Graduate Research and Design.


CB.06 Responding to academic misconduct: Benefits and challenges
Brandy Usick, Director, Student Advocacy and Accessibility, University of Manitoba
Brenda Stoesz, Faculty Specialist – Academic Integrity & Copyright, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

Instructors have an important responsibility to respond to suspicions of academic misconduct when they arise. The institutional policy typically identifies the process to be followed; however, some instructors decide to handle cases outside of the formal procedures for a variety of reasons. Participants will be encouraged to share their views on the benefits and challenges of their own institutional procedures and how these processes can include student learning and development components.

Presenter Bios. See S.01 and S.02.


S.03 Why is it difficult to avoid plagiarism?  Chinese students’ dilemma in English academic writing
Yunyi Chen, Faculty Specialist – Internationalization, The Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, University of Manitoba

Contrary to the view prevailing in some Canadian universities that Chinese students are persistent plagiarizers (1), the students are, in fact, facing numerous challenges while learning what is appropriate and inappropriate in writing English academic papers (2). In this session, the reasons why it is difficult for Chinese students to avoid plagiarism will be looked into in terms of cultural differences, construction of authorial identity, and loss of voice. By the end of the session, the attendees will develop an intercultural awareness to realize and understand Chinese students’ dilemma in English academic writing. In addition, insights gained from this session will help the attendees offer students more effective facilitation to achieve their academic attainments. References: (1) Pecorari, D. (2003). Good and original: Plagiarism and patchwriting in academic second-language writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 12, 317-345. (2) Pennycook, A. (1996). Borrowing others’ words: Text, ownership, memory and plagiarism. TESOL Quarterly, 30, 201-230.

Presenter Bio. Ms. Yunyi Chen, M.Ed., works as a faculty specialist at the University of Manitoba to promote internationalization in teaching and learning. Being a former international student, she is genuinely interested in and passionate about how cultural diversity might affect international students' academic studies in Canadian universities. Triggered by personal experience, she has delved into the common problems Chinese students encounter in learning to write English essay, such as plagiarism and loss of voice. She presented at different conferences to help academics understand Chinese students' dilemma in English academic writing.


CB.07 International students: Academic dishonesty or misunderstanding?
Kelly Carpick, Academic Advisor, Professional, Professional, Applied, Continuing Education (PACE), University of Winnipeg
Ken Molloy, PACE, University of Winnipeg

The Professional, Applied, Continuing Education (PACE) program at the University of Winnipeg is a 1-year diploma program, with classes running 9 am to 4 pm, Monday to Friday. The majority of students enrolled in PACE are international students, and since August 2016, only international students have been accused or charged with academic misconduct. Educating international students about the seriousness of academic misconduct and the possible outcomes is extremely important. This session will begin with a short presentation on the educational strategies used to promote academic integrity and discourage misconduct in the PACE program. AIIIM participants will be encouraged to share and compare their educational strategies for reducing cheating and plagiarism with those used in the PACE program.

Presenter Bios. Kelly Carpick is a relatively new member to the PACE Team at the University of Winnipeg, starting in August 2016 as the Academic Advisor to all full-time students.  She graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Arts Honors degree in Psychology in 2014, and pursued her Masters of Counselling Psychology shortly after.  In April 2016, she completed her Master’s degree, as well as her practicum placement at the Student Counselling Centre at the University of Manitoba, where she developed a passion for working with students.  She works from a student-centered approach, and enjoys facilitating workshops and tutorials relating to student wellness and academic support.

After two years as a continuing education instructor for the U of W and the U of M, Ken Molloy is the newest member of the University of Winnipeg’s staff at PACE. Ken is a graduate of the University of Manitoba, BA (’88), MBA (’13), and worked for 28 years as a police officer with the Winnipeg Police. With extended time in training and fraud investigations, Ken has lectured across Canada and overseas to police forces and other organizations. Ken was appointed a Member of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces in 2007, and is a recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and the Manitoba Excellence in Law Enforcement Award.


CB.08 Providing academic integrity educational student supports
Loie Gervais, Academic Integrity Coordinator, University of Manitoba

When students face challenges with academic integrity, they often experience a loss of confidence and direction in continuing their studies. The Student Advocacy office at the University of Manitoba now offers confidential, one-on-one educational support for students to discuss areas of concern and make a plan for utilizing campus resources to avoid repeat allegations of academic misconduct. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss educational student initiatives to support students in acting with integrity in their coursework.

Presenter Bio. Loie Gervais is the Academic Integrity Coordinator at the University of Manitoba. In her role, she manages projects for the Academic Integrity Advisory Committee, implements institutional communications plans, and provides pre- and post-discipline process educational support to students. She holds an MSc. in Management with a focus on organizational behavior research.



CB.09 Difficult sources: Teaching students the art of integrating and acknowledging sources
Miriam Unruh, Director, Academic Learning Centre, University of Manitoba
Kathy Block, Writing Services Coordinator, Academic Learning Centre, University of Manitoba

Academic Learning Centre (ALC) is a Student Affairs unit that assists students in developing academic writing and learning skills.  One of the most critical yet difficult to learn skills is integrating and referencing sources. As a result, ALC instructors have worked closely with UM Librarians, Advocacy staff, students and faculty to develop materials and programs that can help prevent unintentional plagiarism. This session will provide a brief description of the tools and supports the ALC and its partners have developed and facilitate a discussion of how other institutions are addressing plagiarism in the classroom.

Presenter Bios.  Miriam Unruh is currently the Director of the ALC.  She works one-to-one with graduate and undergraduate students on writing, gives regular workshops on integrating sources and was a standing member of the UM Academic Integrity Committee.

In her work as a Writing Services Coordinator at the ALC, Kathy Block assists students to develop their reading and academic writing skills.